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Niacin – Flush Free Packaging

Flush-Free Niacin

A slow release form of niacin (vitamin B3) that causes significantly less skin flushing than conventional niacin does. Unlike the niacinamide form of vitamin B3, the niacin form (also known as nicotinic acid), helps maintain healthy cholesterol metabolism. Niacin also improves blood circulation, especially to the peripheral parts of the body, such as the hands and feet. Niacin reduces cravings for alcohol and reduces the formation of acetaldehyde, a toxic alcohol metabolite.

R181.00

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Product Indications

Flush-Free Niacin contains a form of niacin, a coenzyme, which naturally assists in the breakdown and utilisation of fats. Inositol hexanicotinate may also improve blood circulation, especially to the peripheral parts of the body, such as the hands and feet. Inositol Hexonicotinate is absorbed by the body and then slowly broken down to niacin and inositol in the tissues. This leads to a slow release effect and dramatically reduces the flushing effect.

Product Composition

Each capsule contains the following as active ingredients:

Inositol hexanicotinate 500 mg

Inactive ingredients: Hypromellose (cellulose) vegetarian capsule shell (gelatin free), microcrystalline cellulose, magnesium stearate (vegetarian – flow agent), magnesium silicate, silicon dioxide and colloidal silicon dioxide.Contains plant extracts and natural fillers, with no colourants added – therefore the colour of the capsule contents may vary slightly from batch to batch.

Storage Instructions

Store in a cool dry place below 25°C. Keep out of the reach of children.

Pharmacological Action

Inositol hexanicotinate, an ester of inositol chemically linked to six molecules of niacin. Once in the blood stream it is hydrolysed to free nicotinic acid and inositol. This hydrolysis occurs slowly which may explain the slow release effect. Niacin is metabolized to form niacinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and niacinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) which play a role in numerous cell processes. Niacin seems to play a positive role in the regulation of blood lipids. It is believed that niacin inhibits free fatty acid release from adipose tissue; and inhibits cyclic AMP accumulation which controls the activity of triglyceride lipase and hence lipolysis. It may also decreases the rate of liver synthesis of LDL and VLDL; and increases the rate of chylomicron triglyceride removal from plasma secondary to increased lipoprotein lipase activity.

Dosage Directions

Adults and children over 12 years of age: Take 1 capsule once or twice daily, with meals. Doses as high as 6 capsules daily (3000mg) can be used, but only under the supervision of a health care provider.

Product Warnings

Do not exceed recommended dosages unless on the advice of a health care provider. Do not use this product if you are allergic to any of the ingredients. If you are on any medication or suffering from any medical condition, it is advisable to seek medical advice before starting any new medicine, supplement or remedy.

Side Effects

Although generally flush-free, sensitive individuals or those taking high doses may still experience mild skin flushing, pruritis and warm sensation. Other side effects may include headache, gastrointestinal upset, hepatotoxicity, hyperuricaemia and impaired glucose tolerance.

Contraindications

Liver disease: Inositol nicotinate should be avoided in people with liver disease. Niacin and niacinamide have been associated with liver damage.

Product Interactions

Anticoagulant medicines: Theoretically, concomitant use might increase the risk of bleading, due to the fibrinolytic effects of inositol nicotinate.

HMG CoA Reductase Inhibitors (Statins) lipid-lowering medicines: Concomitant use may lead to increased risk of myopathy (combined therapy should include careful monitoring).

Alcohol: May exacerbate flushing and pruritis.

Antidiabetes medicines: Concomitant use might interfere with blood glucose control. Inositol nicotinate is metabolized to niacin in the body. Niacin and niacinamide can interfere with blood glucose control requiring dosing adjustment of antidiabetic agents.

Transdermal nicotine: Concomitant use of niacin and transdermal nicotine increases the risk of flushing and dizziness. Inositol nicotinate is metabolized to niacin in the body.

Special Precautions

Liver function tests: Inositol nicotinate may increase levels of liver enzymes. Liver function should be monitored periodically when using doses of 2000 mg per day or more.

Coronary artery disease: Large amounts of niacin, a metabolite of inositol nicotinate, can increase the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. One study showed an increased incidence of cardiac arrhythmias when niacin was used in patients with coronary artery disease; use with caution.

Diabetes: Niacin, a metabolite of inositol nicotinate, can interfere with blood glucose control requiring dosing adjustment of antidiabetic agents. Niacin and niacinamide can cause hyperglycemia, abnormal glucose tolerance, and glycosuria. Increased blood glucose monitoring may be necessary, particularly early in the course of treatment.

Galbladder disease: Niacin, a metabolite of inositol nicotinate, might exacerbate gallbladder disease; use with caution.

Gout: Large amounts of niacin or niacinamide might precipitate gout. Niacin and niacinamide can cause hyperuricemia; use with caution.

Peptic ulcer disease: Large amounts of niacin, a metabolite of inositol nicotinate, might activate peptic ulcer disease.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

Safety in pregnancy and breastfeeding has not been established.

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